2011 Archives-Mellon College of Science - Carnegie Mellon University

2011

U.S. EPA Curbs Air Pollution Blowing Across State Lines
Environmental News Service, July 7, 2011

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency today finalized Clean Air Act regulations that will slash hundreds of thousands of tons of pollutants from coal-fired power plants that drift across state borders...read more


Celsense, Pitt trial to 'see' cells fight cancer
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, July 7, 2011

The notion of using cancerous cells extracted from a patient to fight the disease isn't an entirely new concept, but a new clinical trial involving Downtown-based Celsense Inc. and the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute could lead to breakthroughs in the process...read more


Celsense, Inc. Announces First Clinical Trial Authorization by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) For Use of Its Cell Tracking Imaging Product Cell Sense
TMCNetAmerican Banking NewsClinica SpaceVisibility Magazine, June 27, 2011

Celsense, Inc., announced today that investigators at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI) have received authorization from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to use its Cell Sense reagent in a Phase I clinical trial...read more


How To Put A New Element on the Periodic Table
NPR Morning Edition, June 10, 2011

Two new elements were officially added to the periodic table this month.  The elements were discovered years ago, but they needed approval from an international committee before they could be placed on the famous chart...read more


Two New Elements Join the Periodic Table
Discovery NewsAFP, June 10, 2011

Two new elements are being added to the periodic table after they were discovered through a collaboration between U.S. and Russian scientists, a top U.S. chemistry expert said Friday...read more


Two new elements officially added to periodic table
Associated Press (via ABC News), June 9, 2011

Two new chemical elements, numbers 114 and 116, have been officially recognised by an international committee of chemists and physicists...read more


Periodic Table Gains 2 Newly Created Elements
Bloomberg, June 9, 2011

Scientists have added two new elements to the periodic table, the first additions since 2009. Known as numbers 114 and 116 until they are officially named, the new elements were created through a process known as “cross-bombardment,” in which particles are hurtled into one another through an accelerator...read more


Scientists Welcome Two New Elements to the Periodic Table
Time, June 9, 2011

You may have grown up thinking you knew what was what in science, back when Pluto was a planet, the opposite sex had cooties, and the last 10% of every beverage was known to be backwash. But things change, including the periodic table, which just made two new elements official...read more


Party of Two Is Seated at the Periodic Table
Wall Street Journal, June 9, 2011

Scientists have formally added two new man-made elements to chemistry's periodic table, recognizing a pair of fleeting elements forged in a particle accelerator and lasting just milliseconds before decaying...read more


Periodic Table Expands Once Again
Associated Press (via New York Times)Associated Press (via USA Today) June 8, 2011

They exist for only seconds at most in real life, but they have gained immortality in chemistry: two new elements have been added to the periodic table...read more


Heaviest elements yet join periodic table
New Scientist, June 7, 2011

Elements 114 and 116 have been officially added to the periodic table, becoming its heaviest members yet. They both exist for less than a second before decaying into lighter atoms, but they bring researchers a step closer to making even heavier elements that are predicted to be stable for decades or longer, forming a fabled "island of stability" in the periodic table...read more


Top Institutions in Mathematics
Times Higher Education, June 2, 2011

Carnegie Mellon's math department ranks 18th in the world...read more


Trio Receives Wolf Chemistry Prize
C&E News, June 1, 2011

Two chemists and a chemical engineer are the recipients of the 2011 Wolf Prize in Chemistry, awarded by the Wolf Foundation, a nonprofit organization in Israel, to promote science and art for the benefit of mankind. The researchers were honored for their contributions to the synthesis and understanding of organic materials...read more


Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center Accelerates Machine Learning with GPUs
HPC Wire, May 23, 2011

Computational scientists at the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center (PSC) and HP Labs are achieving speedups of nearly 10 times with GPUs (graphic processing units) versus CPU-only code (and more than 1000 times versus an implementation in a high-level language) in k-means clustering, a critical operation for data analysis and machine learning...read more


Innovator: Carnegie Mellon's Richard McCullough
Bloomberg Businessweek, May 18, 2011

The screens that dominate our lives—smartphones, tablets, televisions—keep getting sleeker and sleeker. Richard D. McCullough says that, soon enough, they'll be as thin as a coat of paint...read more


Kitchen Chemistry
Ivanhoe Broadcast News, May 8, 2011

Chemist Subha Das explains that cooking is all about chemistry and knowing some facts can help chefs understand why recipes go wrong..read more


Plextronics Announces OLED Lighting Distribution Agreement with Sanyo Chemical Industries
Digital JournalPhiladelphia Business JournalLEDs Magazine, May 5, 2011

Plextronics, Inc. announced today that the Company has signed an OLED lighting distribution agreement with Sanyo Chemical Industries, Ltd.  Under the terms of the agreement, Sanyo will distribute select Plexcore® OC inks developed specifically for use in OLED lighting applications in the Japanese market...read more


Tech from Plextroics Could Replace Lightbulbs, "Do Away with iPads"
Bloomberg Businessweek, April 28, 2011

In 1990, Richard McCullough was pondering a new way to make conductive polymers so that they would transfer more electricity in electronic applications. McCullough, then a chemistry professor at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, knew this type of linked molecule was hard to manufacture cheaply on a commercial scale. He thought joining the ends of a chain to form a collapsible loop might solve both problems...read more


Now, visually explore space, time using a time machine!
Daily India, April 22, 2011

Scientists have created a time machine with which one can simultaneously explore space and time at extremely high resolutions. Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University's Robotics Institute have leveraged the latest browser technology to create GigaPan Time Machine, a system that enables viewers to explore gigapixel-scale, high-resolution videos and image sequences by panning or zooming in and out of the images while simultaneously moving back and forth through time...read more


Carnegie Mellon Researchers Build Time Machine That Allows Visual Exploration of Space and Time
TMCnetRed OrbitScientific ComputingWireless Design and DevelomentDaily MeBright Surf, Free RepublicScienceBlog, April 21, 2011

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University's Robotics Institute have leveraged the latest browser technology to create GigaPan Time Machine, a system that enables viewers to explore gigapixel-scale, high-resolution videos and image sequences by panning or zooming in and out of the images while simultaneously moving back and forth through time...read more


CMU unveils photo system that can travel back in time
Ohio Standard, April 21, 2011

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University's Robotics Institute have developed computer browser technology to create the GigaPan Time Machine...read more


Plextronics OLED Ink Again Demonstrates Boost in Lifetime and Lower Operating Voltage at Universal Display Corporation
IT News Online, April 21, 2011

Plextronics announced today that its Plexcore® OC NQ ink has been integrated into Universal Display Corporation's P2OLED™ solution-processed, phosphorescent OLED technology to assist in achieving lower operating voltage and longer lifetime in test devices...read more


Cell Receptor Recycling Mechanism Discovery Opens Up New Class of Therapeutic Targets
Lab Bulletin, April 8, 2011

Prof. Manojkumar Puthenveedu of Carnegie Mellon University studies the mechanisms by which membrane trafficking controls and co-ordinates the complex signalling pathways in the brain. Despite the fact that almost all diseases can be traced to a defect in how cells respond to signals, little is known about how signalling pathways are maintained in normal cells and the changes that occur in abnormal conditions...read more


Chemistry: Fine-tuning polymerization
Nature, April 7, 2011

Synthetic polymers are all around us. Researchers are working on ways to more finely control the chemical process that produces these compounds, to generate polymers with, for example, specific molecular masses and architectures...read more

US researchers process plastics using less copper
Canadian Manufacturing, April 4, 2011

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburg, Pa. have discovered a more specialized and environmentally friendly way of manufacturing plastics. They started off with a process called atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), which is already used to make products such coatings, adhesives and cosmetics...read more


Chimica: con elettricita' create plastiche piu' 'verdi'
ANSA.IT, April 2, 2011

La corrente elettrica puo' sostituire almeno in parte i catalizzatori nelle reazioni che producono le materie plastiche, rendendole piu' sopportabili per l'ambiente. Lo ha scoperto uno studio pubblicato dalla rivista Science a cui ha partecipato anche un ricercatore italiano...read more


Un metodo di polimerizzazione più efficiente
Le Scienze, April 2, 2011

Si configura come metodo più efficiente e flessibile per produrre i polimeri quello messo a punto dal gruppo di elettrocatalisi ed elettrochimica applicata dell’Università di Padova guidato da Armando Gennaro, in collaborazione con il gruppo di Krzysztof Matyjaszewski della Carnegie Mellon University, negli Stati Uniti...read more


Researchers Electrify Polymerization
Science DailyR&D Magazinee! Science NewsFirst ScienceResearch MilestonesNanoTechWire, April 1, 2011

Scientists led by Carnegie Mellon University chemist Krzysztof Matyjaszewski are using electricity from a battery to drive atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), a widely used method of creating industrial plastics. The environmentally friendly approach, reported in the April 1 issue of Science, represents a breakthrough in the level of control scientists can achieve over the ATRP process, which will allow for the creation of even more complex and specialized materials...read more


Tracing Talking Neurons
BioTechniques, March 31, 2011

Scientists at Harvard Medical School and Carnegie Mellon have combined activity and morphological images to map neuronal circuits in the visual cortex with a homemade electron microscope. The method could help researchers map all of the brain’s active circuits...read more


SIAM Names 2011 Fellows
First Science News, March 31, 2011

The Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics today named 34 academics and professionals to its 2011 Class of Fellows for their outstanding contributions to applied mathematics and computational science, including Mathematical Sciences Professor Alan Frieze...read more


Geek Out & Go Green at the GA/GI Festival!
PopCity, March 30, 2011

This weekend, Pittsburgh's first-of-its-kind GA/GI (that's GAH-gee) Festival will transform the East End thoroughfare into an urban laboratory for creativity, invention, production, and even some mistakes we can all learn from along the way. Events include a kitchen chemistry presentation by chemistry professor Subha Das and his students...read more


Neuroni alla festa, neuroni allo stadio
OggiScienza, March 28, 2011

NOTIZIE -Immaginate delle persone a una festa che cercano di parlare e far sentire la propria voce forte e chiara a qualcun altro che sta ascoltando. Oppure immaginate una folla in uno stadio che incita all’unisono la propria squadra. Queste due modalità di comunicazione, secondo Nathan Urban e colleghi della Carnegie Mellon University sono i modi in cui i neuroni cerebrali comunicano normalmente...read more


Can you hear me now? 
SciCastsScience DailyBioTech OnlineHealth CanalMedical News TodayBrightSurf.com, March 25, 2011

There are billions of neurons in the brain and at any given time tens of thousands of these neurons might be trying to send signals to one another. Much like a person trying to be heard by his friend across a crowded room, neurons must figure out the best way to get their message heard above the din...read more


How neurons in the brain decide how to transmit information
Andhra News
MedIndiaDNA IndiaArmenian Medical Networksify, March 25, 2011

Scientists have established a fundamental mechanism by which neurons in the brain communicate. There are billions of neurons in the brain and at any given time tens of thousands of these neurons might be trying to send signals to one another...read more


Cell Receptor Recycling Mechanism Discovery opens up New Class of Therapeutic Targets
NanowerkBionityLaboratory TalkEnterprise Post, March 23, 2011

Prof. Manojkumar Puthenveedu of Carnegie Mellon University studies the mechanisms by which membrane trafficking controls and co-ordinates the complex signalling pathways in the brain. Despite the fact that almost all diseases can be traced to a defect in how cells respond to signals, little is known about how signalling pathways are maintained in normal cells and the changes that occur in abnormal conditions...read more


Only the weak survive?: Pitt/CMU team adds more give for stronger self-healing materials
E! Science NewsR&D Magazine, March 22, 2011

Conventional rules of survival tend to favor the strongest, but Pittsburgh-based researchers recently found that in the emerging world of self-healing materials, it is the somewhat frail that survive. The team presents in the journal Langmuir a new model laying out the inner workings of self-healing materials made of nanoscale gel particles that can regenerate after taking damage and are being pursued as a coating or composite material. Moreover, the researchers discovered that an ideal amount of weak bonds actually make for an overall stronger material that can withstand more stress...read more


DSF Charitable Foundation gives $3.9M to CMU's Center for Nucleic Acids Science & Technology
FirstScienceMedical News TodayChemInfo, March 21, 2011

The DSF Charitable Foundation has given a $3.9 million grant to Carnegie Mellon University's Center for Nucleic Acids Science and Technology (CNAST) to further the development of novel biomedical tools targeted at monitoring and manipulating gene expression...read more


Biology Professor Elaine Reynolds Shows Students the Marvels of the Brain
Lafayette News, March 18, 2011

MCS alumna Elaine Reynolds is known as the Flywoman on Lafayette's campus, a reference that applies to her winged subjects of choice for student research experiments. But it could just as well pertain to the appearance of perpetual motion this biology professor exudes both in and out of the classroom...read more


Was Neuronen mit Facebook-Nutzern gemeinsam haben
Epoch Times Deutschland, February 21, 2011

Laut einer wissenschaftlichen Forschungsgruppe verhält sich eine Ansammlung von Neuronen (also Nervenzellen) in unserem Gehirn so wie aktive Mitglieder eines sozialen Netzwerks wie Facebook. Die Ergebnisse der Studie eines Teams von Wissenschaftlern aus den USA und Deutschland wurden letzten Monat vom Magazin Life Science veröffentlicht...read more


CMU professor awarded chemistry Wolf Prize
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, February 19. 2011

Carnegie Mellon professor Krzysztof Matyjaszewski has been awarded the 2011 Wolf Prize in Chemistry from Israel's Wolf Foundation. The prize is given every year in four out of five categories, in rotation: agriculture, chemistry, mathematics, medicine and physics. Recipients of the Wolf Prize in chemistry, physics and medicine have often later received a Nobel Prize...read more


CMU professor may be on road to Nobel
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, February 18, 2011

A Carnegie Mellon University professor has been awarded the 2011 Wolf Prize in Chemistry, an international honor many regard as a precursor to the Nobel Prize. Krzysztof Matyjaszewski, 60, of Shadyside will share the $100,000 prize with chemists Stuart Alan Rice of the University of Chicago and Ching Tang of the University of Rochester. The Tel Aviv-based Wolf Foundation singled out the men for "deep creative contributions to the chemical sciences."...read more


11 winners of Israel's "Nobel Prize" all from abroad

Jerusalem Post, February 17, 2011

Winners of this year’s Wolf Prizes for the Sciences and the Arts – considered Israel’s “Nobel Prizes” – were announced by Wolf Foundation council chairman and Education Minister Gideon Sa’ar on Wednesday. The Wolf Prize in Chemistry will be shared by three US researchers: Prof. Stuart Alan Rice of the University of Chicago, Prof. Ching Tang of the University of Rochester and Prof. Krzysztof Matyjaszewski of Carnegie-Mellon University, for their work on synthesis of organic materials...read more


Nobel Prize for a Polish Scientist?
Poland.Pl, February 18, 2011

There is a chance and it's great! 40 000 citations, which is two times more than the "average" Nobel Prize winner. In addition the prestigious award in chemical sciences, which may be a harbinger of the greatest prize. Professor Krzysztof Matyjaszewski is a Pole, who finally has a great chance to win the Swedish Academy Prize...read more


Carnegie Mellon's Matyjaszewski to Receive Wolf Prize in Chemistry
EurekalertR&D MagazineChem.InfoEnterprise PostBio-MedicineScientific ComputingPhysOrg.comFirst Science, February 17, 2011

Krzysztof Matyjaszewski, the J.C. Warner Professor of the Natural Sciences at Carnegie Mellon University's Mellon College of Science, has been named a recipient of the 2011 Wolf Prize in Chemistry from Israel's Wolf Foundation...read more


Ten scientists, one artist named as 2011 Wolf Foundation laureates
Jewish JournalMonsters and Critics, February 16, 2011

Ten scientists and an artist are to be awarded the 2011 Wolf Foundation prize, the Israeli government said Wednesday. Professors Stuart Alan Rice of the University of Chicago, Ching Tang of the University of Rochester and Krzysztof Matyjaszewski of Carnegie Mellon University received the award in chemistry for their contributions to the research field of organic material...read more


Nagroda Wolfa dla polskiego chemika
Gazeta WyborczaTVPGazeta Wiadomosci, February 16, 2011 

Krzysztof Matyjaszewski, najsłynniejszy polski, a właściwie polsko-amerykański chemik, profesor Uniwersytetu Carnegie-Mellon, otrzymał 15 lutego 2011 r. Nagrodę Wolfa w dziedzinie nauk chemicznych...read more


Newsmaker: Rebecca Krall
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, February 16, 2011

Krall was among 14 students in the United States awarded a Churchill Scholarship, which will pay for one year of postgraduate study at the University of Cambridge in England...read more


Newsmaker: Stephanie Tristram-Nagle
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, February 10, 2011

Tristram-Nagle has won the third annual Charles E. Kaufman Award by The Pittsburgh Foundation for her groundbreaking research in lipid membranes and HIV peptides. She is donating her $50,000 prize to the university to support her team's research...read more


Carnegie Science Award winners blast off on another mission to inspire
Pop City, February 9, 2011

Awards went to educators and scientists at many levels, including Sara Majetich of Carnegie Mellon University (Emerging Female Scientist Award)...read more


Pregnant Women and Children Need to Avoid BPA
EcoRI, February 8, 2011

Amidst the litany of adverse health effects linked to bisphenol A (BPA), local supermarkets and drugstores are making strides to rid their stores of the toxin. Chemistry professor Terry Collins comments...read more


Carnegie Science Center award winners announced
Pittsburgh Business Times, February 3, 2011

The Carnegie Science Center on Thursday announced the winners of its 2011 Carnegie Science Awards, which are designed to recognize science and technology achievements in western Pennsylvania...read more


Carnegie Science Awards Announced
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, February 3, 2011

MCS professors Sara Majetich and Krzysztof Matyjaszewski have been named recipients of 2011 Carnegie Science Awards from the Carnegie Science Center...read more


Plextronics Achieves ISO 14001:2004 Certification
The Business JournalsYahoo! FinanceSun HeraldBreitbart.comTechnology TodayTec Trends Online,Greentech MediaMedia WorkstationDigital Producer,  WebIndia, January 28, 2011

Plextronics, Inc. announced today it has achieved ISO 14001:2004 certification.  The company was awarded this designation by ABS-QE for its compliance with environmental process standards and effective environmental management systems.  Those standards and systems are used in the production and other operations related to conductive polymers and inks for use in printed electronic applications... read more


Facebook is my classroom
Central Michigan Life, January 25, 2011

Researchers at the other CMU, Carnegie Mellon University, found that within the brain’s neocortex is a network of active neurons that behave similarly to users of Facebook...read more


Polymer Could Create Self-Healing Aircraft
Wired, January 25, 2011

Materials researchers at Carnegie Mellon University of Pittsburgh and Kyushu University of Japan have developed a polymer that can heal itself over and over again when exposed to ultraviolet light. The substance could potentially be used to create products that repair themselves when damaged, including self-healing medical implants or parts for vehicles such as aircraft...read more


A polymer that can repeatedly heal itself when exposed to ultraviolet light
Plastemart.com, January 25, 2011

A polymer that can heal itself over and over again when exposed to ultraviolet light has been developed by materials researchers at Carnegie Mellon University and Kyushu University. The substance could potentially be used to create products that repair themselves when damaged, including self-healing medical implants or parts for vehicles such as aircraft...read more


Neurons Act Like Social Network
The Epoch Times, January 21, 2011

According to a study published last month in the scientific magazine Life Science, a group of scientists from several U.S. and German research centers demonstrated in an experiment that the behavior of a population of neurons in our brain behave as active members of a social network like facebook...read more


Oh, And While You're At It...
Corante, January 21, 2011

Well, this is a question that (I must admit) had not crossed my mind. Courtesy of Slate, though, we can now ask how we can make pharmaceuticals more environmentally friendly. No, not the manufacturing processes: this article's worried about the drugs that are excreted into the water supply...read more


UV Heals New Polymer Repeatedly
Paint Square, January 21, 2011

U.S. and Japanese scientists have developed a polymer that can heal itself over and over again when irradiated with UV light. This is the first material in which capped covalent bonds reattach repeatedly, even allowing fully separated pieces to be fused back together, the team reports in Angewandte Chemie, the peer-reviewed journal of the German Chemical Society...read more


The Healing Power of Light
Technology Review, January 20, 2011

A new polymer material that can repeatedly heal itself at room temperature when exposed to ultraviolet light presents the tantalizing possibility of products that can repair themselves when damaged. Possibilities include self-healing medical implants, cars, or even airplane parts...read more


Self-Mending Polymer Could Enable Medical Implants to Fix Themselves
Medical Product Manufacturing News, January 20, 2011

A new polymer material that can repeatedly heal itself at room temperature when exposed to ultraviolet light could eventually lead to the development of self-mending medical implants. Created by researchers at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU; Pittsburgh) and Kyushu University (Fukuoka, Japan), the polymer heals itself when a crack is pressed together and exposed to UV light...read more


Experts Create Self-Healing Polymer
Softpedia, January 18, 2011

A collaboration of investigators from the Kyushu University and the Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) announces the development of a new type of polymer, that can mend itself. Whenever it is damaged, a simple exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light makes it as new again...read more


CMU to Present Panel Discussion on Understanding the Brain and Behavior
News BlazeWeb India, January 18, 2011

The enigmatic human brain, central to our development, health and lives, is becoming less of a mystery. World-renowned Carnegie Mellon University scientists are making important discoveries that will help researchers to decipher and improve learning, perception and thinking; deal with aging or injured brains; and treat and understand disorders such as autism, dyslexia and Alzheimer's...read more


Facebook Resembles Neurons In Your Brain, According To New Research
Social Media SEO, January 15, 2011

Facebook seems to have a similar pattern of functionality as neurons in our brains – a small group of highly popular neurons seem to do the most work, and have the greatest influence with other neurons...read more


Neuronas que se comportan de manera similar a miembros de una red social
Juventud Rebelde, January 15, 2011

Al igual que sucede en Facebook, estas redes neuronales tienen una población pequeña de partes muy activas, más conectadas, que dan y reciben más información que el resto de neuronas de su red, explican los científicos...read more


Cérebro funciona como Facebook, diz estudo

Galileu, January 14, 2011

Nossos neurônios agem como os usuários mais populares do Facebook, segundo uma pesquisa da Universidade Carnegie Mellon, nos Estados Unidos...read more


Cientistas identificam "neurônios Facebook"
Diario da Saude, January 14, 2011

Cientistas da Universidade Carnegie Mellon (EUA) descobriram que, dentro do neocórtex cerebral, existe uma sub-rede de neurônios altamente ativos que se comportam como pessoas em redes sociais...read more


It Heals and Grows Together: A Polymer with Amazing Self-Healing Properties
Innovations ReportPhysOrgR&D MagazineKompetenznetze, January 12, 2011

Krzysztof Matyjaszewski and his co-workers at Carnegie Mellon University (Pittsburgh, USA) and Kyushu University (Japan) have now developed a polymer that can repair itself when irradiated with UV light—over and over again. As the scientists report in the journal Angewandte Chemie, this is the first material in which capped covalent bonds repeatedly reattach, even allowing fully separated pieces to be fused back together...read more


Samoleczące się polimery
RolkKopalnia Wiedzy, January 12, 2011

Żywe tkanki mają wyjątkową zdolność do samoleczenia się. Od dawna marzeniem technologów materiałowych były samo samonaprawiające się tworzywa, ale do tej pory osiągnięcia nie były porywające: w tworzywach sztucznych umieszczano na przykład mikroskopijne kapsułki z substancją, która przy uszkodzeniu „zaklejała” ubytki...read more


Científicos hallaron neuronas ?Facebook? en el cerebro
Yahoo! MexicoEl TelegrafoEl Centinela, January 12, 2011

Un estudio de la Universidad de Carnegie Mellon, en Estados Unidos, reveló que hay un grupo de neuronas en el cerebro humano que se comportan como un usuario de Facebook. La población de neuronas de gran actividad se ha encontrado dentro de la parte del cerebro cree que es responsable de funciones como el pensamiento consciente del lenguaje y espacial razonamiento, dijeron los investigadores...read more


Neurons Resemble Active Social Networkers
LiveScienceYahoo! News, January 12, 2011

A population of neurons behaves like the active members of a social networking site such as Facebook, a new study suggests. The population of highly active neurons has been found within the part of the brain believed to be responsible for functions like conscious thought, language and spatial reasoning, the researchers said...read more


Scoperti i neuroni Facebook: l'area del cervello che funziona come un social network

Yahoo! Italia, January 12, 2011

Un segnale di quanto Facebook è entrato nelle nostre vite? Una equipe di studiosi americani fa una scoperta storica sul funzionamento del cervello degli animali; una faccenda complessa, di neuroni, proteine e "fattori di trascrizione". Ma basta un attimo e la scoperta diventa comprensibile anche per chi di neuroscienze non ne capisce proprio nulla. Basta usare un paragone chiaro a tutti. E così gli scienziati della Carnegie Mellon University hanno annunciato al mondo: abbiamo scovato i "neuroni Facebook"...read more


Aivosi ovat kuin Facebook
TiVi.Fi, January 12, 2011

Neurotutkija Alison Barth kuvailee aivojen toimintaa nykynuorisonkin ymmärtämällä kielellä. Barthin tutkimusryhmä yhdysvaltalaisessa Carnegie Mellon -yliopistolla havaitsi hiirillä tehdyissä kokeissa pienen neuroniryhmän vastaavan pääosasta aivojen työtä. Niiden vastuulla on muun muassa tietoinen ajattelu, kielellisyys ja tilallinen ajattelu..read more


Scientists Identify "Facebook Neurons" in the Brain
ZeeNews, January 12, 2011

Scientists have discovered that the brain’s neocortex contains a complex network of highly active neurons called ‘Facebook’ neurons. These networks have a small population of highly active members who give and receive more information than the majority of other members...read more


Científicos Descubren Neuronas Tipo "Facebook"
GlobediaCronica Viva, January 12, 2011

Investigadores de la Universidad Carnegie Mellon (EE UU) han encontrado dentro del neocórtex del cerebro una subred de las neuronas con gran actividad que se comportan de manera similar a los miembros de una red social...read more


Investigadores descubren neuronas 'Facebook' en los humanos
Periodista DigitalLa InformacionIBL NewsMedicina TVSiglo XXIPeru.comAtlantico DiarioInternational News, Noticias de Salud, January 11, 2011

La Universidad de Carnegie Mellon (EE.UU.) ha hecho público un estudio de sus investigadores que revela un tipo de neurona que tiene un comportamiento similar a los distintos modelos de usuarios que existen en la red social Facebook...read more


Cerebros tipo Facebook
abcdesevilla, January 12, 2011

Tu cabeza funciona como Facebook. Según han descubierto en la Universidad de Carnegie Mellon, en Estados Unidos, hay un tipo de neurona en el cerebro de las personas que funciona como los distintos modelos de usuarios que existen en la red social Facebook...read more


Descubren neuronas 'Facebook' en los humanos
Diario Salud, January 12, 2011

La Universidad de Carnegie Mellon (EEUU) ha hecho público un estudio de sus investigadores que revela un tipo de neurona que tiene un comportamiento similar a los distintos modelos de usuarios que existen en la red social Facebook...read more


How Your Brain is Like Facebook
Gawker.com, January 11, 2011

Scientists and writers love to compare brains to whatever the cool new technology is. Your brain is a steam engine! Your brain is a telephone! A calculator! A computer! And now, in 2011? Your brain is like Facebook, of course. That's the comparison Carnegie Mellon neurology researcher Alison Barth hints at in a new paper about the behavior of neurons, anyway...read more


Cientistas identificam “neurônios do Facebook”
R7 Noticias, January 11, 2011

Pesquisadores da Universidade de Carnegie Mellon, nos Estados Unidos, descobriram que dentro do neocórtex (áreas mais evoluídas do córtex) existe uma sub-rede de neurônios (células do sistema nervoso responsáveis pela condução dos impulsos nervosos) muito ativos que se comportam como se fossem pessoas em redes sociais...read more


"Facebook Neurons" could shed light on brain's centre of higher learning
NewsTrack IndiaNew KeralaDaily IndiaTop NewsDaily News and AnalysisIndiaVision, January 11, 2011

Scientists have discovered that the brain's neocortex contains a complex network of highly active neuronscalled 'Facebook' neurons. These networks have a small population of highly active members who give and receive more information than the majority of other members...read more


Researchers Identify "Facebook Neurons"
ScienceBlogredOrbitScience DailyLabspacesPhysOrg.com, Enterprise Post NewsNews Guidee! Science NewsBioMedicineR&D MagazineMediLexicon, January 11, 2011

Carnegie Mellon University researchers have found that within the brain's neocortex lies a subnetwork of highly active neurons that behave much like people in social networks. Like Facebook, these neuronal networks have a small population of highly active members who give and receive more information than the majority of other members, says Alison Barth, associate professor of biological sciences at Carnegie Mellon and a member of the Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition (CNBC)...read more


Engineer's Endwoment provides The Pittsburgh Foundation with $50 million
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, January 5, 2011

A chemical engineer from Bridgeville who died last year at age 97 has given The Pittsburgh Foundation $50 million, the largest gift in its 65-year history and one that aims to transform Pennsylvania into a powerhouse of scientific research...read more


The Little Green Pill
Slate, January 3, 2011

The past few years have seen the advent of a new eco-scare: The unsettling afterlife of pharmaceuticals. Drug residues excreted by humans and livestock linger in our waterways, often for months, before decomposing. The effects of these residues are hard to isolate and poorly understood, but scientists have discovered hints of trouble...read more


Winners of 2011 Student Travel Awards Announced by Biophysical Society
MediLexicon, January 2, 2011

The Biophysical Society has announced the winners of its student travel award to attend the scoiety's 55th Annual Meeting.  Winners include MCS's Lea Veras...read more


Discovery of New Mechanism for Signaling Receptor Recycling Could Create New Class of Drug Targets
BioPortfolioMediLexiconSTS News,  January 1, 2011

An international team of researchers led by Carnegie Mellon University's Manojkumar Puthenveedu has discovered the mechanism by which signaling receptors recycle, a critical piece in understanding signaling receptor function. Writing in the journal Cell, the team for the first time describes how a signaling receptor travels back to the cell membrane after it has been activated and internalized...read more