THE YOUNG KARL MARX

Directed by Raoul Peck | Germany / France / Belgium | 2017 | 118 min


EVENT INFORMATION


PITTSBURGH PREMIERE!

Thursday, September 14, 2017
6:00pm
- Food Reception / 6:45pm - Film Screening | McConomy Auditorium, CMU


BUY TICKETS!

 

EVENT INCLUDES:

  • Food Reception (precedes film)
  • Post-screening Q&A moderated by Kathy M. Newman, Associate Professor of English (CMU), David Shumway, Director of The Humanities Center (CMU), & Roger Rouse (Pitt)

CO-PRESENTED WITH: Marx@200

SPONSORED BY: Pitt's Center for Russian & Eastern European Studies

ORGANIZED BY: The Humanities Center at CMU and Dietrich College


ABOUT THE FILM


“A few years back, while the world was going through yet another financial crisis, I felt the need to go back to the basics: The analysis of the violent capitalist society we are still embedded in, through these three young Europeans of wealthy families (Karl, Friedrich and Jenny) who decided to change this utterly unequal world. And they eventually did; though not the way they imagined it.”

- Director Raoul Peck

At the age of 26, Karl Marx embarks with his wife Jenny on the road to exile. In Paris in 1844 they meet young Friedrich Engels, son of a factory owner, who’s studied the sordid beginnings of the English proletariat. The three together, Karl, Jenny and Friedrich, between censorship and police raids, riots and political upheavals, preside over the birth of the labor movement, which until then had been mostly makeshift and unorganized. This will grow into the most complete theoretical and political transformation of the world since the Renaissance – driven, against all expectations, by this brilliant, insolent and sharp-witted young trio.


AWARDS


  • Traverse City Film Festival, 2017, Founders Prize Founders Grand Prize


ABOUT THE DIRECTOR




Raoul Peck is a director, screenwriter and producer. Born in Haiti, he was raised in Congo, in the US and in France. He then studied Economic Engineering at the TU Berlin and the DFFB Berlin. Peck served as Haiti’s Minister of Culture in 1996 and 1997, and since 2010 he has been the president of La Fémis in Paris, the famous film and television school. In 2001, the Human Rights Watch Organization awarded him with the Irene Diamond Lifetime Achievement Award. He served as jury member at the 2012 Cannes Film Festival, as well as jury member at the Berlinale in 2002.  His latest work, I Am Not Your Negro (2016), received an Oscar nomination for best documentary.