Events-Environment at CMU - Carnegie Mellon University

Upcoming Environmental Events

Distinguished Lecture Series in Environmental Science, Technology and Policy Presents: Gary Paul Nabhan, the W.K. Kellogg Endowed Chair in Sustainable Food Systems at the University of Arizona

"Tapping Into the Wisdom of Traditional Farmers: Sustainably Growing Food in the Face of Climate Uncertainty"

February 3, 2014 ~ Porter Hall, Porter 100

4:30pm

Over the next half century, climate change will dramatically affect which food crop varieties reach optimum quality in nearly every foodscape in North America. Farmers' selection of crop varieties and how they grow them in each microclimate will be radically reworked by declining chill hours, extreme summer temperatures, the changed frequency of tropical storms, and extended droughts. Fresh water scarcity and increasing salinity will also change what food plants can be grown in many localities as well, not just in already arid areas, but along all coasts. By listening to traditional and innovative farmers on five continents and seeing how they are adapting their diversity of food crops to climate extremes, Nabhan offers options to greater reliance on a few "climate-ready" GE crops, each of which costs close to 5 million US dollars to develop, market and employ. The farm-based strategies for innovation developed through biomimicry, ecomimicry and etnomimicry will be highlighted.

Carnegie Mellon Community Garden Group Presents: "Growing Cities: A Film About Urban Farming In America"

February 4, 2014 ~ Margaret Morrison A14

6:30pm

"Growing Cities" is a documentary film that examines the role of urban farming in America and asks how much power it has to revitalize our cities and change the way we eat.  Join us for screening, pizza and conversation!

Environmental History Lecture Series Presents: Matthew Klingle, Associate Professor of History & Environmental Studies, Bowdoin College

"A Disease of Civilization?: Diabetes, Race, and the Changing Nature of American Health"

February 13, 2014 ~ Room TBA

4:30-6:00pm

In 1889 the British physician Robert Saundby labeled diabetes mellitus "one of the penalties of advanced civilization." At the dawn of the twenty-first century, Saundby's prediction continues to resonate. Diabetes has become a global scourge. But much of what scientists and physicians know about the disease and its complications today, especially its Type 2 variant, originated from studies on so-called "primitive" peoples, notably Native Americans, who were seen as resistant to chronic disease. Yet how have populations once considered immune to the ravages of modernity become some of the most vulnerable? This lecture explores how the convergence of biomedical science with concerns over health disparities and environmental changes produced new ideas about diabetes etiology, epidemiology, prevention and treatment. Rethinking diabetes as environmental history may help us to reframe this dreaded malady as a disease of longstanding inequities-embodied over space and over time, in our landscapes and in ourselves.

Environmental History Lecture Series Presents: Chris Sellers, Associate Professor, Stony Brook University

"Pollution and Politics Around Post-WWII Atlanta: The Long Shadow of Underdevelopment"

February 28, 2014 ~ Room TBA

4:30-6:00pm

Around the time of the first Earth Day, in 1970, Atlanta's confrontations with water pollution seem to defy the narrative about pollution you might cull by looking at larger cities in other regions of the country.   Around the latter, my recent book has shown how pollution itself became the central motivating issue in the creation of a more popular environmentalism, what better enabled its support to cross lines of class and even race. But in the Atlanta area, even as William Ruckelhaus of the new EPA targeted this city's laxity in treating its effluents, Georgia's new environmental activists prioritized parks and nature reserves.  Understanding the very different political profile of pollution in the Atlanta area by 1970 requires a more in-depth look at just how pollution itself unfolded around postwar Atlanta, as well as why early activists made so little of them.

The Distinguished Lecture Series in Environmental Science, Technology and Policy Presents:  Michael K. Hansen, Ph.D. , Senior Staff Scientist, Policy and Advocacy Division, Consumer Union 

"Genetically Modified Food and Consumer Effects"


March 3, 2014 ~ Porter Hall~ Porter 100
4:30pm


Dr. Michael Hansen has been sharing his scientific expertise as a senior staff scientist with Consumers Union for more than 20 years. A biologist and ecologist who did his Ph.D. in the techniques of Integrated Pest Management, he currently works primarily on food safety issues. He has been largely responsible for developing Consumer Union positions on safety, testing and labeling of genetically engineered food and "mad cow" disease. Since 2003, he has worked on a multi-state effort to ban the use of food crops to produce pharmaceutical drugs and industrial chemicals. Dr. Hansen's areas of expertise include critical food safety and environmental health issues including mad cow disease, genetic engineering, and pesticide use.

Farmers Markets on Campus every Tuesday

Purchase local food, taste free samples, try featured local items on CulinArt's own menu items and take home
some recipe cards. Mark your calendar for the upcoming farmers markets.
  • March 4 & 25, 12-3 pm: University Center with Evgefstos feature
  • March 18, 5-8 pm: Resnik with Chef's Table feature
  • *April 8 & 22, 12-3 pm: University Center with chef demo & Evgefstos feature
  • *April 15 & 29, 5-8 pm: Resnik with chef demo and Chef's Table feature
*Outdoor if weather permitting

The Heinz Distinguished Lecture Presents:  Vanessa Farquharson, National Post Journalist and Eco Blogger

"Sleeping Naked and Showering in the Dark: The Fun Path to Green Living"

April 1, 2014 ~ William Pitt Union, University of Pittsburgh

4:30pm

Register online at the Mascaro Center website by March 24, 2014!

Farmers Markets on Campus every Tuesday

Purchase local food, taste free samples, try featured local items on CulinArt's own menu items and take home
some recipe cards. Mark your calendar for the upcoming farmers markets.
  • March 4 & 25, 12-3 pm: University Center with Evgefstos feature
  • March 18, 5-8 pm: Resnik with Chef's Table feature
  • *April 8 & 22, 12-3 pm: University Center with chef demo & Evgefstos feature
  • *April 15 & 29, 5-8 pm: Resnik with chef demo and Chef's Table feature
*Outdoor if weather permitting

Spring Carnival Weekend

April 10-12, 2014

Carnegie Mellon University celebrates Carnival 100: Best of the Best.  Join us in celebrating campus sustainability while you enjoy the Zero Waste All Campus BBQ. Students from CMU Solar Splash, Engineers without Borders, Project Greenlight, Sustainable Earth, the Carnegie Mellon Community Garden Group and many more will share their innovative sustainability projects with demos and hands on activities.

Farmers Markets on Campus every Tuesday

Purchase local food, taste free samples, try featured local items on CulinArt's own menu items and take home
some recipe cards. Mark your calendar for the upcoming farmers markets.
  • March 4 & 25, 12-3 pm: University Center with Evgefstos feature
  • March 18, 5-8 pm: Resnik with Chef's Table feature
  • *April 8 & 22, 12-3 pm: University Center with chef demo & Evgefstos feature
  • *April 15 & 29, 5-8 pm: Resnik with chef demo and Chef's Table feature
*Outdoor if weather permitting

Steinbrenner Institute Annual Environmental Research Expo

April 22, 2014 ~ Singleton Room, Roberts Hall

4:30-6:30pm

For more information on the event or if you would like to exhibit contact Erika