Behrmann Lab - Carnegie Mellon University

National Academy of Sciences Inductee

In 2015, Dr. Behrmann was elected into the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), making her the first female scientist from Carnegie Mellon University to be granted this prestige. Founded by Abraham Lincoln in 1863, the NAS is charged with "providing independent, objective advice to the nation on matters related to science and technology.1" Read about the history and current state of the NAS on the NAS website.

Dr. Marlene Behrmann

Dr. Marlene Behrmann is a Professor of Psychology at Carnegie Mellon University, who's research specializes in the cognitive basis of visual perception, with a specific focus on object recognition. Dr. Behrmann received her B.A. in speech and hearing therapy in 1981, followed by her M.A. in speech pathology in 1984, both from the University of Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa. She then received a Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of Toronto in 1991. 

Dr. Behrmann is widely considered to be a trailblazer and a worldwide leader in the field of visual cognition. Above and below are some examples of her published works.

This recent paper in PNAS uses MEG data (roughly 10,000 trials per participant) to explore the temporal dynamics associated with the representation of facial identity. [Vida, M., Nestor, A., Plaut, D. and Behrmann, M. (2016). Visualizing the Spatio-temporal Dynamics of Neural Representations of Individual Face Identities, Proc. Nat. Academy of Sci (PNAS), 114, 2, 388-393. PMID: 28028220]

 Vida et al.

This paper is the result of a collaboration by Marlene Behrmann and Patricia Maurides, a photographer from the College of Fine Arts at CMU. Discusses interdisciplinary approaches from art and neurosciences. [Maurides, P. and Behrmann, M. (2017). The brain as muse – bridging art and neuroscience. Leonardo, 10.1162/LEON_a_01402, Publication January 2017.]

maurides

Here we compared the fMRI brain responses in adult individuals with autism and with schizophrenia in response to visual, auditory and somatosensory stimuli. [Haigh, S., Gupta, A., Barb, S., Glass, S. A., Minshew, N. J., Dinstein, I., Heeger, D., Eack, S. M. and Behrmann, M. (2016). Differential sensory fMRI signatures in autism and schizophrenia: Analysis of amplitude and trial-to-trial variability, Schizophrenia Research, 175(1-3): 12-9. doi: 10.1016/j.schres.2016.03.036. PMID: 27083780.]

haigh

1 http://www.nasonline.org

Professor of Psychology, Dr. Marlene Behrmann, Ph.D. 

CV

 

A picture of Dr. Marlene Behrmann, Ph.D.

B.A. in Speech and Hearing Therapy: University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg

M.A. in Speech Pathology: University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg

Ph.D. in Psychology: University of Toronto, Canada

News In Behrmann Lab

Publications:

Collins, E., Park, J. and Behrmann, M. Number in the human subcortex, Proc. Nat. Academy of Sci (PNAS), in press.

Maurides, P. and Behrmann, M. (2017). The brain as muse – bridging art and neuroscience. Leonardo, 10.1162/LEON_a_01402, Publication January 2017.

 Avidan, G., Rosenthal, G. and Behrmann, M. (2017). Congenital prosopagnosia: What’s new? Progress in Brain Research, in press.

 Heeger, D., Behrmann, M. and Dinstein, I. (2016). Vision as a beachhead. Biol Psychiatry. 2016 Sep 29. pii: S0006-3223(16)32855-4. doi: 10.1016/j.biopsych.2016.09.019. [Epub ahead of print] Review. PMID: 27884424

Vida, M., Nestor, A., Plaut, D. and Behrmann, M. (2016). Visualizing the Spatio-temporal Dynamics of Neural Representations of Individual Face Identities, Proc. Nat. Academy of Sci (PNAS), 114, 2, 388-393. PMID: 28028220

News