The First Patient Treated Using Celsense MRI Cell Tracking Technology - CTTEC - Carnegie Mellon University

Thursday, April 11, 2013

The First Patient Treated Using Celsense MRI Cell Tracking Technology

Celsense, Inc. announced today that the first patient to have transplanted cells imaged by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using the company’s Cell Sense technology has been treated at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI).    The Phase 1 clinical trial was cleared by the US FDA for the purposes of developing information regarding cell migration following administration of live cells.

This application, involving the use of an autologous dendritic cell vaccine to treat colorectal cancer, is the first time the trafficking of a live cell cancer vaccine in patients has been visualized by MRI in the United States. The administration of live cell vaccines is an emerging strategy to treat a variety of cancers.

Investigators believe that the unaided trafficking of dendritic cells to the lymph node is fundamental to the success of this therapeutic strategy. "We are excited that this study is finally moving forward. While this is only the first patient to be imaged in the clinical trial, we expect that data from this study as a whole will lead to improved outcomes for patients receiving live cell vaccines for cancer," said Charlie O'Hanlon, President and CEO of Celsense.

“Where infused therapeutic cells migrate, how many go where, and how long they stay is something about which we have very little data in a clinical setting. To-date there have been few, if any, tools at our disposal to use in obtaining this information in humans,” says cell therapy industry analyst, Lee Buckler, Managing Director of the Cell Therapy Group. “Cell Sense certainly represents one of the first and only cell imaging technologies that has been cleared by a regulatory agency for human use and to that extent it signals a significant step forward in our ability to learn from what it tells us the cells do post-transplant.”

This clinical trial has been funded by an RO1 grant from the National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health. The co-investigators at UPCI are Drs. Pawel Kalinski and David Bartlett. Other investigators include Dr. Eric Ahrens at Carnegie Mellon University and Dr. Amy Wesa at Celsense.

Article courtesy of PRWeb