Carnegie Mellon University

Robert Mehrabian Collaborative Innovation Center

Industry's Home on Campus: Robert Mehrabian Collaborative Innovation Center

The vision of the Robert Mehrabian Collaborative Innovation Center (CIC) is to create the optimal environment to serve the next generation of university–industry collaboration.

The Robert Mehrabian CIC is a four-story, 136,000-square-foot, dry-lab research facility built in 2005 to provide office and lab space for technology companies wishing to collaborate with Carnegie Mellon to create innovative new concepts and products for the marketplace.

Collaborative Innovation Center SignThe Robert Mehrabian CIC is a partnership between Carnegie Mellon, the Carnegie Museums, and local economic development organizations and is funded with $8 million in Commonwealth of Pennsylvania tax support.

It also represents the hub of Carnegie Mellon's engagement in the Keystone Innovation Zone (KIZ) program, a program to accelerate economic growth and encourage collaboration between colleges, universities, local economic developers, local government, and businesses within our region.

The facility promotes regional economic development as Carnegie Mellon researchers work with industry to develop new technologies, business ventures, and jobs.

Construction of the center was funded with state capital and Department of Community Development funds, Carnegie Mellon financing, and support from the City of Pittsburgh and the Regional Industrial Development Corporation.

"As Carnegie Mellon's first effort to create space on campus for joint research with industry, the building is a celebration of the goals of the KIZ program. The building creates a nexus for industry, federal, and university research—supporting start-ups, enhancing competitiveness for federal research funding, and creating a landing zone for companies," said Mark Kamlet, Carnegie Mellon provost and senior vice president. Kamlet said the building is a hotbed for next-generation wireless and mobile computing, robotics, and trustworthy computing applications.

Carnegie Mellon’s original campus design is said to have been modeled after a ship by the campus’s initial architect Henry Hornbostel. An actual ship's prow taken from the historic cruiser, the USS Pennsylvania, rests atop Roberts Hall, which overlooks Panther Hollow and the Carnegie Museum complex.

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