Program Participants

 

 

Glen Asner received a B.A. in history in 1994 from the University of Wisonsin--Madison and an M.S. in history from Carnegie Mellon University in 1997. His major research interests include U.S. Business History and the History and Sociology of Technology. Glen's dissertation, "Navigating the Cold War Economy: Corporate Strategy and Commercial Innovation, 1945-1975," examines how U.S. corporations organized their research and development function in response to massive government investment in science and technology during the Cold War."

E-mail: asner+@andrew.cmu.edu
 

Jennifer Bannister received a B.A. in history in 1993 from Rutgers University and an M.A. in history from Carnegie Mellon University in 1995. Jennifer's dissertation, entitled "Behind the Box: Science, Technology, and the Television Industry, 1920-1970," studies the technological and organizational development of television. In addition to her work on television, Jennifer has pursued several research project relating to the history of Pittsburgh and its industrial development. Jennifer also maintains an active interest in urban history and gender studies.

E-mail: jbdr+@andrew.cmu.edu
 

Richard Douglas Davis received a B.A. from Colgate University and an M.A. in English from Temple University. As a doctoral student in Carnegie Mellon's Program in Literary and Cultural Theory, he is working on his dissertation, "Bolts from the Blue: Narratives of Total War in Literature, Science, and Technology, 1949-1989," a study of how nuclear weapons became meaningful as instruments of mass destruction, how that sensibility was reproduced in cold war fiction and film, and how it affected science. He received the Burns Graduate Essay Prize from the Society for Literature and Science for "Violence and Agency in the Fossil Record: The Cold War Science of Geological Catastrophism," first delivered in the Cold War Science & Technology Colloquium, April 9, 1999.

E-mail: rd3w+@andrew.cmu.edu
 

Gerard J. Fitzgerald received a BA in history from the University of Georgia in 1996 and an MS in History and Policy from Carnegie Mellon University in 1997. His major research interest involves the nexus between practice in modern biology and medicine and the concomitant rise of industrial and military technologies. In addition he is interested in the relationship between technology and gender and general historic questions concerning collective memory. His dissertation is a study of the United States biological warfare research conducted during World War II and the early Cold War.

E-mail: gjf+@andrew.cmu.edu
 

Sharon Ghamari-Tabrizi served as the Cold War Science and Technology Program's first Post-doctoral Fellow. Dr. Ghamari-Tabrizi has done work on Herman Kahn, a mathematical physicist who worked for the RAND Corporation from 1947 to 1960. Her work focuses both on Kahn's development of simulation techniques at RAND for modeling nuclear war, and on the genres and other aesthetic resources Kahn invoked to substantiate hypothetical scenarios of future war. Her work on Kahn is coming out in a Carnegie Mellon History and Policy working paper series. She is currently working on an intellectual history of civil defense scientific research.

E-mail: sghamari@wesleyan.edu
 

David Jardini is a postdoctoral fellow in Carnegie Mellon's Center for History and Policy. He earned a B.A. in economics from Swarthmore College and completed his Ph.D. in History at Carnegie Mellon in 1996. David is currently working under National Science Foundation sponsorship on a forthcoming book entitled Thinking Through the Cold War: RAND, National Security, and Domestic Policy, 1945-1975, which studies the history of the RAND Corporation and its role in the development of policy analysis. He has also published on the history of technology in the steel industry, and he performs strategic consulting to firms in the U.S. steel industry.

E-mail: dj0v+@andrew.cmu.edu
 

Anthony A. McIntire earned a Ph.D. from the University of Kentuky in 1996, specializing in the history of the Vietnam War. His dissertation, "The American Soldier in Vietnam," is a study of the intersection of combat motivation and Cold War ideology. He is currently a Postdoctoral fellow at Carnegie Mellon working on a study of the role of technology in the Vietnam war. His article, "The Limits of Technology in Modern Warfare: Airmobility in the Ia Drang Campaign, 1965," is forthcoming in The Limits of Technology in Warfare, ed. by Brian Sullivan and Andrew Bacevich.

E-mail: aam2@andrew.cmu.edu
 

Asif A. Siddiqi received a B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering and an M.S. degree in Economics from Texas A&M University. He also received an M.B.A. from the University of Massachusetts-Amherst in 1997. He is the author of Challenge to Apollo: The Soviet Union and the Space Race, 1945-1974, which is to be published in 1999 by the NASA History Office. His current interests are the history of the Soviet ballistic missiles and space program and the evolution of the post-World War II Soviet military-industrial complex.

E-mail: asiddiqi+@andrew.cmu.edu
 

Josh Silverman earned a B.A. in Philosophy and History at Rutgers University in 1986 and an M.S. in History and Policy from Carnegie Mellon in 1995. His dissertation, "No Immediate Risk: Environmental Safety and Nuclear Weapons Production, 1942-1996," examines the development of risk assessment and waste management practices in the production and testing of nuclear weapons in the United States. See his article "Radioactive Waste Management: An Environmental History Lesson for Engineers (and Others)"

E-mail: joshs+@andrew.cmu.edu

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