CIPI Director Jendayi Frazer examines the origins of the conflict in South Sudan-Center for International Policy & Innovation - Carnegie Mellon University

Monday, December 30, 2013

CIPI Director Jendayi Frazer examines the origins of the conflict in South Sudan

CIPI Director Jendayi E. Frazer, Distinguished Service Professor at Carnegie Mellon University, South Sudan flagformer U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs (2005-2009), discussed the recent conflict in the Republic of South Sudan. Listen to the interview. Heavy fighting broke on December 15 in the capital Juba and quickly spread to four other states, forcing over 120,000 people to flee their homes. Some 63,000 people have sought refuge at the U.N. peacekeeping bases around the country. South Sudan's President Salva Kiir has accused his former vice president, Riek Machar, of attempting a coup.

Dr. Frazer spoke with several news organizations about this recent conflict, including WNYC’s “The Takeaway” , where she examines the origins of the conflict in South Sudan and how the international community should move forward. “In many ways, the promise of nationhood...will be realized over the long-term. Although there is an ethnic element, the current conflict is more political, and therefore can be resolved through dialogue. Regional mediation--working with its African neighboring countries such as Kenya, Ethiopia, and Uganda who are familiar with South Sudan’s struggle for independence--offers clear hope for long-term success.” Frazer goes on to provide analysis of the ethnic groups in conflict and the relationship that the U.S. has with South Sudan.