CIPI Breakfast Briefing with U.S. Department of State Ambassador Carlos Pascual, Special Envoy and Coordinator for International Energy Affairs-Center for International Policy & Innovation - Carnegie Mellon University

Monday, July 1, 2013

CIPI Breakfast Briefing with U.S. Department of State Ambassador Carlos Pascual, Special Envoy and Coordinator for International Energy Affairs

Register now World Affairs Council members and CMU guests: No charge. Others: $15 Participants must register to attend.No-shows /cancellations after July 12 2013 will be charged.

Breakfast Briefing in partnership with the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh:
Energy in a Global Context: Challenges and Opportunities

Ambassador Carlos Pascual, Special Envoy and Coordinator for International Energy Affairs--U.S. Department of State
July 18, 2013, 8:00 - 9:30 a.m., at The Rivers Club, 301 Grant St., Pittsburgh (Map)

It seems that U.S. energy independence is not a matter of “if,” but “when.” Oil production in the U.S. is increasing, and natural gas continues to be a boom industry across the country. Trends certainly indicate that the U.S. enjoys a significant comparative advantage in the “energy mix.” In an increasingly interconnected global community, economic interdependence--particularly within the realm of the energy trade--demands new and innovative approaches to policy and diplomacy. Much lies upon this balance, including national security, sustainable economy, and civil society. As an emerging global energy center, Pittsburgh finds itself at the nexus of this discourse.

View the flier for this event

While the U.S. certainly has many resources at its disposal, other countries have substantial energy reserves as well. However, access remains a particular challenge, affecting both the developed and developing world. Obstacles such as water shortages and limited technology constrain many societies from reaching their full potential. Sustainable energy is at many fingertips, but currently resides just out of reach. In a rapidly changing geopolitical system, it remains in the self-interest of the U.S. to continue to be engaged. While energy independence displays obvious benefits, Americans must approach the global community anew, and not draw back.

Join the World Affairs Council and Carnegie Mellon University’s Center for International Policy and Innovation for a conversation with a distinguished U.S. public servant about the impact of energy on an evolving global community.

U.S. Department of State Ambassador Carlos Pascual, Special Envoy and Coordinator for International Energy AffairsAmbassador Carlos Pascual is the U.S. State Department’s Special Envoy and Coordinator for International Energy Affairs. He was appointed to this position by former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton on May 18, 2011. In this capacity, he advises the Secretary on energy issues, ensuring that energy security is advanced at all levels of U.S. foreign policy. Prior to his appointment, Amb. Pascual served as the United States Ambassador to Mexico from 2009 to 2011, and was Vice President and Director of the Foreign Policy Studies Program at the Brookings Institution from 2003 to 2009. During his extensive career in public service, Amb. Pascual has held positions in the Department of State, the National Security Council (NSC) and the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). He received his M.P.P. from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University in 1982 and his B.A. from Stanford University in 1980.

Registration

Please register online before July 12. There is no charge for World Affairs Council members and CMU guests; others: $15. Participants must register to attend. Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions. No-shows and cancellations after July 12, 2013 will be charged.

Banner photo credit AP