Emeritus Faculty-Civil and Environmental Engineering - Carnegie Mellon University

Tung Au

Tung Au

Professor Emeritus, Civil and Environmental Engineering

Tung Au served the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering with great distinction from 1957 until his retirement in 1992. Dr. Au taught and conducted research across a broad spectrum of civil engineering in his 35 years on the faculty, including applied mechanics, structural engineering, systems analysis and design, and construction project management. He received numerous honors throughout his career, including being recognized as an Honorary (Distinguished) Member of the American Society of Civil Engineers in 1991.

Dr. Au received his BS degree from St. Johns University (China) in 1943; and his MS (1948) and PhD (1951) degrees from the University of Illinois, all in Civil Engineering. After working for several years as a structural engineer in consulting firms in Detroit, Michigan, he joined CEE as a faculty member in 1957. Dr. Au served as the Acting Head of Civil Engineering in 1970-1971 and again in 1985-1986.   

He has authored or co-authored of seven books, including Elementary Structural Mechanics (1963), Introduction to Systems Engineering: Deterministic Models (with Thomas Stelson, 1969), Fundamentals of Systems Engineering: Probabilistic Models (with Richard Shane and Lester Hoel, 1972), Engineering Economics for Capital Investment Analysis (with Thomas Au, 1983, 1991), Structural Analysis (with Paul Christiano, 1987), Project Management for Construction (with Chris Hendrickson, 1989), and Fundamentals of Structural Analysis (with Paul Christiano, 1992). 

Dr. Au retired in 1992 and currently resides in California.


Lawrence Cartwright, P.E.

Lawrence Cartwright, P.E.

Professor Emeritus, Civil and Environmental Engineering

Email: cartwright@cmu.edu

After service in the US Air Force, Larry Cartwright enrolled in Civil Engineering at Carnegie Mellon and completed his BSCE in 1976. He joined the Department staff as manager of the Civil Engineering Laboratories in 1977. In 1982 he was appointed additionally as an Instructor. While managing the labs and helping out with laboratory courses, he made time to complete a masters degree in Civil Engineering, in 1987. With the steady expansion of his teaching duties, Larry was promoted to Senior Lecturer in 1990, Principal Lecturer in 2000, and Teaching Professor in 2004, the highest rank in the teaching faculty track.  

In 1994 Professor Cartwright received the Benjamin R. Teare Teaching Award from CIT, the highest teaching recognition from the College of Engineering. Winning the Teare Award puts one in the competition for the top teaching award at Carnegie Mellon, the Ryan Teaching Award, which Larry also won in 1994. Larry was recognized by the Pittsburgh Section of the American Society of Civil Engineers as the Professor of the Year in 1999. In 2001, he won a Best Paper Award from the American Society for Engineering Education for a presentation about our senior design course, and in 2004 he received the CIT Philip L. Dowd Fellowship Award for his work in our various undergraduate laboratories.

Professor Cartwright’s motivation and heart was always been in advising and working with students over his 38‐year career with the department. He was the instructor for a number of undergraduate courses including Solid Mechanics Lab, Fluid Mechanics Lab, Soil Mechanics Lab, Materials Lab, CEE Design, and Design and Construction. He developed  imaginative senior capstone design projects, and also a unique design and construction course that yielded many permanent improvements on the Carnegie Mellon campus.

Professor Cartwright retired from Carnegie Mellon in June 2013, and taught part-time in the subsequent two academic years.  He resides in Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania.  


Steven J. Fenves

Steven J. Fenves

University Professor Emeritus, Civil and Environmental Engineering

Dr. Fenves' research and teaching has been devoted to computer-aided engineering, an emerging discipline that seeks to understand, model and improve the processes civil and environmental engineers use in the planning, design, construction and operation of engineered facilities. He was the co-developer of one of the earliest structural analysis systems (STRESS, 1962). His research has dealt with design standards, engineering databases, knowledge-based systems, machine learning, and comprehensive design environments.

Dr. Fenves is the author or co-author of six books, over 100 journal articles and book chapters, and over 120 articles and conference papers. His 38th PhD student graduated in May 1998. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and an Honorary Member of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). Among his awards are the Huber Prize and the Moisseif and Winter Awards from ASCE, the Alumni Honor Award and Distinguished Alumnus Award from the University of Illinois, and the Teare Award and Doherty Prize from Carnegie Mellon University.

He received his BS (1957), MS (1958) and Ph.D. (1961) degrees in Civil Engineering from the University of Illinois, and served on the faculty there (1958-71). He joined Carnegie Mellon University in 1972, serving as Head of the Civil Engineering Department (1972-75) and Director of the Design Research Center (1980-84), attaining the position of University Professor in 1984. He retired from active teaching in 1998.

Upon retirement, Dr. Fenves moved to the Washington D.C. area to be close to family and to work with colleagues at the National Institute of Standards and Technology.


Francis C. McMichael

Francis C. McMichael

Professor Emeritus, Civil and Environmental Engineering and Engineering and Public Policy

Email: fm2a@andrew.cmu.edu

Dr. McMichael joined Carnegie Mellon in 1967, and held appointments in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and the Department of Engineering and Public Policy.  He served as Head of Civil Engineering from 1975-1979, and was appointed the first Walter J. Blenko, Sr. Professor of Environmental Engineering in 1981, a position he held until his retirement and transition to Professor Emeritus in 2002.   

Throughout his career Dr. McMichael worked extensively on applying material and energy-balance approaches to the study of environmental problems. He was very involved in the startup of the Green Design Institute in the 1990s.  His green design research involved application of concurrent engineering concepts to the design of products and processes to mitigate environmental impacts over their life cycle. Dr. McMichael and his collaborators developed methodologies and design advisors for process engineering, such as size reduction and materials separation for products such as automobiles, computers, consumer durables, and electronics.

Dr. McMichael earned his BS in 1958 from Lehigh University and his MS (1959) and PhD (1963) degrees from the California Institute of Technology. He continues to live in Pittsburgh and remains active in the Department.