Molecular Biology and Genetics-Department of Biological Sciences - Carnegie Mellon University

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Marcel P. Bruchez

Associate Professor

The Bruchez Group studies the dynamics of translation and co-translational regulation of protein synthesis and folding using single molecule biophysical measurements.
Webpage, Group Website

Charles A. Ettensohn

Professor

The Ettensohn laboratory studies complex gene regulatory networks that underlie embryonic development and uses gene knockdown techniques to dissect the developmental functions of genes.
Faculty Webpage

N. Luisa Hiller

Assistant Professor

The Hiller group studies molecules involved in intercellular communication within bacterial biofilms using gene deletions, overexpression systems and reporter strains.
Faculty Webpage

Jonathan W. Jarvik

Associate Professor

In the Jarvik laboratory, viral vectors are used to create mammalian cell lines expressing reporter-tagged proteins that exhibit native regulation while retaining native biochemical and structural integrity.
Faculty Webpage

Adam D. Linstedt

Professor

The Linstedt group is investigating molecular mechanisms that establish and maintain the membrane-bounded compartments of the secretory and endocytic pathways. Approaches include permeabilized cell assays, biochemical reconstitutions, cell imaging techniques and molecular genetic experiments.
Faculty Webpage

A. Javier López

Associate Professor

The Lopez group employs genetic, genomic, and molecular approaches in Drosophila to characterize regulatory mechanisms for alternative splicing and how they influence development. The role of recursive splicing in the expression and evolution of large transcription units are principal areas of study.
Faculty Webpage

Brooke M. McCartney

Associate Professor

In the field of developmental genetics, the McCartney laboratory uses the powerful genetic tools available in Drosophila to investigate questions of signal transduction and cytoskeletal organization.
Faculty Webpage

C. Joel McManus

Assistant Professor

The McManus group studies the structure and function of RNA sequences that regulate alternative splicing and mRNA translation using molecular biology and genetics techniques. We are also investigating the genetic mechanisms of gene regulatory network evolution.
Faculty Webpage, Laboratory Website

Jonathan S. Minden

Professor

Researchers in the Minden laboratory are using genetics and molecular biology approaches to study to role certain genes and proteins play in controlling how cells change shape during Drosophila embryogenesis. They are also using the same methods to study early protein changes during developmentally regulated cell death.
Faculty Webpage

Aaron P. Mitchell

Professor

The Mitchell laboratory applies new gene disruption and overexpression strategies to identify C. albicans genes that govern pathogenesis and to understand their functional relationships, and to understand the mechanistic relationships in a fungal endosome-associated signal transduction pathway.
Faculty Webpage

Manojkumar A. Puthenveedu

Assistant Professor

The Puthenveedu laboratory uses molecular and functional genetic tools to study membrane trafficking events that regulate signaling by G protein-coupled receptors in model cells and neurons.
Faculty Webpage

Russell S. Schwartz

Professor

The Schwartz laboratory is developing of mathematical models and computational methods for analyzing genetic polymorphism data, and applying them to problems in intraspecies phylogenetics and detecting correlations between genotype and phenotype. In addition, they are developing new methods for reconstructing evolutionary histories of cell lineages in cancers.
Faculty Webpage

John L. Woolford

Acting Department Head and Professor

The Woolford group is studying the biogenesis of ribosomes in yeast. They have been developing methods for purification and characterization of ribosome assembly intermediates. Both site-directed mutagenesis as well as genome-wide genetic screens and selections are being employed to identify networks of physical and functional interactions necessary for biogenesis of ribosomes.
Faculty Webpage

Eric Xing

Affiliated Biological Sciences Faculty

Eric Xing develops statistical models and machine learning algorithms for biological network inference and characterization, cis-regulatory module decoding, regulatory evolution modeling, quantitative trait locus mapping, genome polymorphism patterning, and population genetic analysis. He is also applying these quantitative approaches to investigate the mechanisms of breast cancer development and metazoan morphagenesis.
Faculty Webpage