Developmental Biology-Department of Biological Sciences - Carnegie Mellon University

Developmental Biology

Alison L. Barth

Associate Professor

Work in the Barth laboratory focuses on the physiological and molecular mechanisms underlying experience-dependent plasticity of the neocortex, and how this aspect of cortical function changes through development.
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Charles A. Ettensohn

Professor

Researchers in the Ettensohn laboratory study gene regulatory networks, developmental plasticity, axis specification, cell signaling pathways, and morphogenetic cell movements in the early sea urchin embryo.
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Veronica F. Hinman

Associate Professor

The Hinman laboratory studies evolution of developmental mechanisms using marine invertebrate embryo and larval models. Of particular interest are gene regulatory networks (GRNs), which are researched to discover essential features of animal development and gain a better understanding of how evolutionary changes are incorporated into developmental programs.
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Sandra J. Kuhlman

Assistant Professor

The Kuhlman laboratory is investigating how sensory experience influences the construction of neuronal circuits used for behavioral adaptation and learning.
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A. Javier López

Associate Professor

The López laboratory uses various model systems to understand how splicing of pre-mRNA is regulated in vivo and how alternative splicing influences development and cellular function. Recursive splicing mechanisms and their role in expression of very large transcription units are extensively studied.
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Brooke M. McCartney

Associate Professor

Research in the McCartney laboratory is aimed at elucidating the relationship between Wnt/Wingless signal transduction and cytoskeletal organization in Drosophila development using the APC family of tumor suppressors as a model.
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Jonathan S. Minden

Professor

The Minden laboratory is using proteomics and time-lapse microscopy to study how cells change shape during Drosophila embryogenesis. They are also using the same methods to study early protein changes during developmentally regulated cell death.
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Eric Xing

Affiliated Biological Sciences Faculty

The Xing laboratory developes statistical models and machine learning algorithms for biological network inference and characterization, cis-regulatory module decoding, regulatory evolution modeling, quantitative trait locus mapping, genome polymorphism patterning, and population genetic analysis. He is also applying these quantitative approaches to investigate the mechanisms of breast cancer development and metazoan morphagenesis.
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