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Press Release

Contact:
Eric Sloss
412-268-5765

For immediate release:
October 19, 2005

Carnegie Mellon School of Music Performs the Popular "A Chorus Line" During Homecoming Weekend

PITTSBURGH—Carnegie Mellon University's School of Music students will perform the Broadway sensation "A Chorus Line" during Homecoming weekend, October 27-29.

Show times are Thursday, October 27, 8 p.m.; Saturday, October 29, 2 p.m. and 8 p.m.; Sunday, October 30, 2 p.m. Ticket prices are $15 for adults, $12 for senior citizens and $10 for students. For tickets, call Amy Stabenow at 412-268-2383. The production will take place in the Kresge Recital Hall in the College of Fine Arts building on the Carnegie Mellon campus.

"'A Chorus Line' is one of the most successful music theater pieces of our time. Its composer, Marvin Hamlisch, has particular importance for Pittsburgh through his marvelous work with the Pittsburgh Symphony Pops; the Carnegie Mellon School of Music has previously presented his musical 'Smile,'" said Alan Fletcher, head of the School of Music. "'A Chorus Line' is a particularly good choice for a training program like ours in that it has so many equally important roles and opportunities for a very large and diverse cast to shine. It is also a dance show, which will stretch our students," he said.

"A Chorus Line" is the story of 25 young men and women vying for eight coveted spots on a chorus line. Spurred by a largely unseen—and rather sadistic—director named Zach, each dancer in turn reveals truths that, supposedly, will help the director make his final choices. "A Chorus Line" opened May 21, 1975, at the 299-seat Newman Theater in the Public Theater complex during the New York Shakespeare Festival. On July 25, 1975, it moved to the 1,472-seat Shubert Theatre, where it remained until its closing on April 28, 1990.

Surpassed only by "Cats," "A Chorus Line" earned the distinction of the second-longest-running show on Broadway. The passion of the piece came from director/choreographer Michael Bennett's desire to make these dancers represent the thousands of gypsies over the years who diminished their own careers to support the star. "A Chorus Line" won almost every prize, including the Pulitzer and nine Tony Awards, two of which went to Bennett. Hamlisch and Ed Kleban also won a Tony for their score.

"Every generation leaves its mark for future generations to learn from. Carnegie Mellon's cast of 'A Chorus Line' has 'learned their lessons well,' said Chet Walker, director/choreographer of the production. "They are singing 'What I did for Love' and we from the past remember and won't forget." The School of Music is one of the nation's most distinguished degree-granting music conservatory programs and is one of five schools within Carnegie Mellon's College of Fine Arts. The College of Fine Arts is a community of nationally and internationally recognized artists and professionals organized into: Architecture, Art, Design, Drama and Music, and their associated centers and programs.

For more information on the School of Music or the College of Fine Arts, contact Eric Sloss at 412-268-5765 or by email at ecs@andrew.cmu.edu or visit www.cmu.edu/cfa.

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