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Press Release

Contact:
Lauren Ward
412-268-7761

For immediate release:
February 26, 2003

Third Annual Computational Biology Symposium at Carnegie Mellon University Human Genetics and Genomics: Computational Challenges

What:

Third Annual Computational Biology Symposium at Carnegie Mellon University Human Genetics and Genomics: Computational Challenges

When:

12:30 to 5:30 p.m., Wednesday, March 12

Where:

3305 Newell-Simon Hall

Who:

Dannie Durand, Department of Biological Sciences and Computer Science, Carnegie Mellon, 12:30 to 12:45 p.m., Introduction

Martin Farach-Colton, Department of Computer Science, Rutgers University, 12:45 to 1:45 p.m., Genome Assemblies and Interval Graphs

Sarah Tishkoff, Department of Biology, University of Maryland, 2:15 to 3:15 p.m., Patterns of Human Genetic Diversity: Implications for Human Evolution and Disease

Russell Schwartz, Department of Biological Sciences, Carnegie Mellon, 3:15 to 4:15 p.m., Algorithms for Extracting Information from Human Genetic Variation

Reception, 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.

Why:

Now that we have the human genome sequence, what can we do with it? Deciphering the human genetic code so that we better understand gene function in sickness and health, gene interaction in living cells and our own evolutionary history is an extraordinary challenge facing 21st-century biologists. Computational tools to analyze the human genome sequence are crucial to this endeavor. This year's Computational Biology Symposium reviews and critiques methods used to assemble the human genome sequence for analysis, as well as algorithms to capture variation in that sequence from one individual to another. These discussions will be placed in the context of our understanding of human genetic diversity, current ways to address questions about human evolution and research on the ability of genetic variation both to protect against disease and to increase our susceptibility to illness.

Web:

For registration/more information: www.cs.cmu.edu/~durand/symposium03.html

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